Young Kenyans Build Mobile Apps For Local Use

College students and recent graduates crammed the top floor of a tech hub in Nairobi for a competition built around the theme Solutions for the Next Billion Mobile Users. Africa has more than 600 million mobile phone users (approximately 11 percent of the global total) – and the number is growing.

Instagram Sells For $1 Billion, Despite No Revenue

The technology world is abuzz over Facebook's $1 billion deal to acquire the photo-sharing app Instagram. Two years ago Instagram didn't exist. Some reasons behind the company's meteoric rise: apps are everywhere and Instragram took advantage of the moment with a playful, easy-to-use service. Now Instagram's fans wonder whether its identity will be retained.

Freelanced: The Rise Of The Contract Workforce

One in five workers is a contract worker, according to a new NPR/Marist poll. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the workforce, a shift with far-reaching implications.

Here's Why Environmentalists Are Cheering The Latest Burger At Sonic Drive-In

The fast-food chain is about to roll out a new kind of burger, made from a mixture of beef and mushrooms. Sonic calls it "uniquely delicious." Environmentalists say it could help save the planet.

The Opioid Crisis Is Surging In Black, Urban Communities

Opioid overdose deaths among middle-aged black men have increased 245 percent in the past three years in Washington, D.C.

21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife Trafficking

The effort involves tech leaders such as Alibaba, Baidu, eBay, Facebook and Instagram who have pledged to try to reduce trafficking across their platforms by 80 percent by 2020.

Bias Isn't Just A Police Problem, It's A Preschool Problem

A new study by researchers at Yale found that pre-K teachers, white and black alike, spend more time watching black boys, expecting trouble.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

'It's been a minute' is another way of saying 'let's catch up.' Host Sam Sanders does just that every Friday with two guests in a conversation about the news, culture, and everything. Not just what happened each week, but how it felt. Plus, Tuesday deep dives — conversations with one guest, or on one topic. The world is complicated and people are, too — and sometimes you just need to talk it out.

Hidden Brain

The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

TED Radio Hour

We often think that scientific research is reserved for PhDs and other experts. But now that's changing. This hour, TED speakers on how ordinary citizens are helping make groundbreaking discoveries.

Recruiters Use 'Geofencing' To Target Potential Hires Where They Live And Work

Geofencing sets up virtual boundaries to enable tracking of mobile devices in an area. It can be used to send coupons to customers. Now some employers are using it to target and recruit workers.

Tesla Going At 'Warp Speed,' But Lags In Race To Produce Mass Market Electric Cars

The Model 3 is supposed to take Tesla mainstream and bring it to profitability. But CEO Elon Musk's company has missed production goals, and analysts wonder whether he's spreading himself too thin.

Disparities Persist In School Discipline, Says Government Watchdog

Black students, boys, and students with disabilities are disproportionately disciplined in K-12 schools across the country, according to the Government Accountability Office.

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

There's an explosion of interest in personalized diet approaches and at-home test kits are popping up everywhere. Part of the approach includes analyzing your DNA, but genes can only tell us so much.

'Criminal Cabal'? FBI Fears Political Attacks May Imperil Work Of Field Agents

Current and former special agents worry that the Bureau's tumble through the political spin cycle might hurt their ability to do their jobs across the country.

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

Popular DNA ancestry tests don't always find what people expect. That's due to how DNA rearranges itself when egg meets sperm, and also the quirks of genetic databases.

MILCK: 'Women Are Viral'

The singer talks about her new EP, her history making moment at the 2017 Women's March in Washington, D.C., and how courage and truth can lead to widespread healing.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sat down with NPR's Nina Totenberg at the Sundance Film Festival on Sunday where she discussed her thoughts on the #MeToo movement.

From Carnegie Hall To Pyeongchang, Speedskater Heads To His First Olympic Games

Speedskater Kimani Griffin will make his first Olympic appearance for the 2018 Winter Games next month, but he's no stranger to the spotlight. NPR's Michel Martin talks with Griffin about the trip.

Watch Local Natives Play On A Dock Off The East River

Watch the California band play "Fountain Of Youth" on an overcast summer evening in Brooklyn.

Recruiters Use 'Geofencing' To Target Potential Hires Where They Live And Work

Geofencing sets up virtual boundaries to enable tracking of mobile devices in an area. It can be used to send coupons to customers. Now some employers are using it to target and recruit workers.

Planet Money

The economy, explained, with stories and surprises. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening. That's what we're going for at Planet Money. People seem to like it.

expand_less